AFC Clayton Juniors

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FA MINI-SOCCER

Updated May 2008

The Best Introduction to the World’s Greatest Game

September 1999 saw the implementation of Mini-Soccer for all children under 10 years of age.

As a result of nearly three years’ consultation and co-operation between all bodies involved with

children’s football, boys and girls are now introduced to the game on smaller pitches with scaled

down goalposts and fewer players.

The Football Association deems Mini-Soccer the most appropriate and fun introduction to football

by providing quality experiences for all young players.

It allows greater involvement in the game, with more touches, dribbles and passes.

Mini-Soccer: Meeting the needs of children

“The children are more important than the activities in which they are engaged. The game is not the

thing, the child is.” (Physical Education for ages 5-16 - Department of Education and Science,

August 1991).

The main theme throughout Mini-Soccer is to meet the needs of children. 11-a-side association

football does not meet these needs. Children need a modified game that fits their needs; too often

children are modified to meet the requirements of a game. Mini-Soccer modifies association

football without losing the essence of the game.

Mini-Soccer is the appropriate introduction to football. All available research and observation

shows that children will have more fun and learn more playing a game with smaller teams and

modified rules. Mini-Soccer is, therefore, a game children can actually play rather than struggling

to understand a game created for adults.

If children are to enjoy and take part in soccer they need to:

• Feel success

• Take an active part in the game

• Learn to play as a team

• Understand the Laws

• Develop soccer skills

• Be able to take part whatever their ability

• Develop their fitness

Mini-Soccer sets out to meet those needs. It allows children to succeed and take part in something

that is still recognisably football.

Mini-Soccer recognises the fact that younger children perform better in smaller teams with simple

Laws.

Mini-Soccer, however, is more than another version of five-or six-a-side football for the following

reasons:

1. It recognises that children do not perform as adults and therefore its Laws, researched and

piloted by The Football Association, meet the needs of children.

2. It has all the features of ‘real’ football to children.

3. It doesn’t set unrealistic expectations. Many adults do not know what can be expected of

children and so emphasise the result at the expense of performance. Mini-Soccer helps by

defining the targets for children at different ages.

FA MINI-SOCCER

4. It sets a standard for behaviour on and off the pitch.

5. Mini-Soccer is for all children regardless of their ability. It is intended for girls and boys, and

young footballers with disabilities and learning difficulties.

In an age when so much of children’s leisure time is as organised as their study, Mini-Soccer offers

something special: a game that children can organise themselves! With relatively little instruction,

children can play and enjoy a game which is suitable for a wide ability range and gives everyone a

chance to take part.

If you find this hard to believe, just set up a game with some children and WATCH!

Guidance for the Laws of Mini-Soccer

The Laws have been piloted and aim to be simple and as near to ‘real’ football as possible. The

games require only a ‘game-leader’ who is urged to be as flexible as possible with the youngest

children.

The children will need the Laws explained to them as the game proceeds (e.g. handball, in/out of

play).

It will also be necessary to demonstrate in certain instances how to re-start the game (e.g. throwins).

What can children expect from adults?

Remember that children are often easily led, anxious to please and prone to over-enthusiasm, and

so plenty of praise and positive reinforcement is needed, especially with beginners.

Children find it hard to understand negative instructions and easier to understand positive

reinforcement and this can frequently mean playing down the result and playing up the

performance. This reduces the child’s anxiety and decreases their worry about failing. Remember

that children do not mean to make mistakes; we should accept mistakes as a necessary part of

learning.

Make sure the players play by the Laws. The majority of children at these ages will not knowingly

infringe the Laws of the game. Finally, work with other adults, not against them, and by so doing

reinforce positive attitudes among the children.

Interference from the touch line

Whilst the fun and friendly atmosphere created by Mini-Soccer should keep such instances to a

minimum, there may be situations where comments and abuse from adults, parents and managers

is made from the touch line.

This could be directed at the referee, but also at the players.

What can be done?

Stay calm; do not get into disagreement; report the matter to relevant club or league officials; set a

positive responsible example.

Remember The FA’s RESPECT campaign.

Referees – Mini-Soccer game leaders

The referee has an important role to play in Mini-Soccer. Carrying out their duties without favour,

they should create a playing environment which is fun for all those taking part. The referee should

encourage fair play, fun, respect for others, development of skills and team work, and

understanding of the Laws of the game.

The Laws of the game should be a guide for the referee in Mini-Soccer with the spirit of the Laws

being more important than the letters of the law. Appreciation of the needs of the child is essential.

FA MINI-SOCCER

9v9

During the 2002/03 season a number of leagues approached The FA regarding the possibility of

moving to 9v9 at under 11.

The FA organised a number of Regional Mini-Soccer Consultation Meetings to review Mini-Soccer

and to discuss ideas for the future development of the game.

The consultation also lead to the introduction, within FA rules, for the 9v9 game for children who

have reached the age of 10 on 31st August.

The 9v9 option is available from U11-U14.

When 9v9 is played The FA recommends the following:

Follow 11v11 laws of the game, except:

• Size of pitch: use junior size pitch 80m x 50m and junior goals 16’ x 7’. It has been agreed

by The FA that for season 2008/09, the use of any sized goals will be permissible for the

9v9 game, whilst a transitional period continues to exist in this format of the game.

However, there is recognition that the 16’ x 7’ goals are most suitable during matches and

as such clubs should be encouraged to make the most of the Football Foundation’s funding

to gain this size of goal. From season 2009/10, only goals sized 16’ x 7’ will be permissible.

• Substitutes: Maximum squad of 18 with repeat substitutions allowed

• Playing Time: Maximum 35mins each way

• Anything not covered above, FA standard code of rules for youth leagues

apply

The FA hopes that, where facilities allow leagues will make use of the 9v9 option to assist the

players’ development.

FA MINI-SOCCER

THE FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION LAWS FOR MINI-SOCCER

FOR PLAYERS (BOTH BOYS AND GIRLS OVER THE AGE OF 6 AND UNDER 10)

[Updated by The FA Council on 15th May 2008]

Please note: Where Leagues operate Under 11 Mini-Soccer events, they must follow these Laws.

Please remember:

Under-7s or Under-8s are not permitted to play in leagues where results are collected or published

or winner trophies are presented, this is deemed to be detrimental to the development of the player

and the game and will not be sanctioned. To play in a KO Cup game or a game where points are

awarded, or results collected, a player must have achieved the age of 8 on or before 31st August.

Except where other provision, is made, the Laws of Association Football apply. Each Law is

numbered to correspond with the appropriate Law of the Game. These Laws are mandatory unless

special permission is granted by The Football Association.

LAW 1 - Playing Area

FA MINI-SOCCER

WARNING

Please ensure that The FA Goalpost safety guidelines are observed.

Size of Pitch

Under-l0s/9s Under-8s/7s

Width Metres Yards Metres Yards

Min. 27.45 Min. 30 Min. 18.30 Min. 20

Max. 36.60 Max. 40 Max. 27.45 Max. 30

Length Min. 45.75 Min. 50 Min. 27.45 Min. 30

Max. 54.90 Max. 60 Max. 45.75 Max. 50

Penalty Area

Length 9.15m – 10 yards; Width 16.47m – 18 yards

Penalty Mark

The penalty mark is 7.32m (8 yards) from the goal line opposite the centre of the goal.

Halfway Line

The field of play is divided into two halves by a halfway line. The centre mark is indicated at the midpoint

of the halfway line.

Goal Size

The distance between the posts is 3.6m (12ft) and the distance between the lower edge of the cross

bar and the ground is 1.88m (6ft).

LAW 2 - The Ball

The ball should be size 4 for U9/U10.

Size 3 for Under-8s.

It should be safe and made of leather or another suitable material.

LAW 3 - Number of Players

Number Per Team (including goalkeeper)

Under-10s/9s 6v6 or 7v7

Under-8s/7s 4v4, 5v5, 6v6 or 7v7

Where the appropriate facilities are available, The FA would encourage leagues and competitions

to use the smaller number of players at the youngest age group.

Players must play with and against players only from their own age range, as per Football Association

and Competition rules.

Players should not be allowed to begin to play until the season of their 7th birthday.

Each team must not have a squad greater than double the size of the team per age.

Any number of substitutes, without being named, may be used at any time with the permission of

the referee or game leader. Entry into the field of play will only be allowed during a stoppage in

play. A player who has been replaced may return to the playing area as a substitute for another

player.

LAW 4 - Playing Equipment

Players must wear shin guards and goalkeepers must wear a distinguishing playing strip.

Shin guards must be covered entirely by stockings.

FA MINI-SOCCER

LAW 5 - Referees

The Authority of the Referee

Each match is controlled by a referee who has full authority to enforce the Laws of the game in

connection with the match to which they have been appointed.

Powers and Duties

The Referee:

• Enforces the Laws of the game

• Controls the match in co-operation with the assistant referees/time keeper

• Ensures that the ball meets the requirements of Law 2

• Ensures that the players’ equipment meets the requirements of Law 4

• Stops, suspends or terminates the match at their discretion for any infringements of the

Laws

• Stops, suspends or terminates the match because of outside interference of any kind

• Stops the match if, in their opinion, a player is seriously injured and ensures that they are

removed from the field of play

• Ensures that any player bleeding from a wound leaves the field of play

• Allows play to continue when the team against which an offence has been committed will

benefit from such an advantage

• Penalises the original offence if the anticipated advantage does not ensue at that time

Referees

• Take disciplinary action against players guilty of cautionable and/or sending-off offences

• Take action against team officials who fail to conduct themselves in a responsible manner

and may, at their discretion, expel them from the field of play and its immediate surrounds

• Ensure that no unauthorised persons enter the field of play

• Restart matches if they have been stopped

Decisions of the Referee

The decisions of the referee regarding facts connected with play are final.

The referee may only change a decision on realising that it is incorrect or, at his/her discretion

provided that play has not restarted.

LAW 6 - Timekeeper/Scorer/Assistant Referee

Duties

A person may be nominated to assist the referee to:

• Record goals scored

• Act as timekeeper and signify to the referee by an agreed signal when the time of each half

has expired

• Suspend time on an instruction from the referee for all stoppages and add that time to the

end of each half

• Supervise the use of rolling substitutes

• Carry out any other duties as prescribed by the referee

If an independent timekeeper/scorer is not nominated, these duties are the responsibility of the

referee.

FA MINI-SOCCER

LAW 7 - Duration of the Game

In any one day, no player shall play more than the stipulated period given below:

• Under-7 & Under-8s-40Minutes

• Under-9 & Under-10s- 60 Minutes

Each league/competition will determine its own playing time within the maximum time permitted.

The half time interval must not exceed 5 minutes.

LAW 8 - Start and Restart of Play

Procedure

A kick-off is taken at the centre of the playing area to start the game and after a goal has been

scored. Opponents must be 4.5m (5 yards) away from the ball, and in their own half of the field.

The ball must be played forward.

In Mini-Soccer a goal cannot be scored directly from a start or restart of play.

Special Circumstances

A drop ball to restart the match, after play has been temporarily stopped inside the penalty area,

takes place on the penalty area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest to where the ball was

located when the play stopped.

LAW 9 - Ball In and Out of Play

Ball Out of Play

The ball is out of play when:

• It has wholly crossed the goal line or touch line whether on the ground or in the air

• Play has been stopped by the referee

Ball In Play

The ball is in play at all other times, including when:

• It rebounds from a goal or post, crossbar or corner flag post and remains in the field of play

• It rebounds from either the referee or an assistant referee when they are on the field of play

LAW 10 - Method of Scoring

Goal Scored

A goal is scored when the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, between the goalposts and

under the crossbar, provided that no infringement of the Laws of the game has been committed

previously by the team scoring the goal.

Winning Team

The team scoring the greater number of goals during a match is the winner. If both teams score an

equal number of goals, or if no goals are scored, the match is drawn.

Competition Rules

For matches ending in a draw, competition rules may state provisions involving extra time, or other

procedures approved by the International FA Board to determine the winner of a match.

Please note this must be included within the maximum participation time.

LAW 11 - Offside

There is no offside.

FA MINI-SOCCER

LAW 12 - Fouls and Misconduct

In Mini-Soccer all free kicks are direct.

A free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following offences in a

manner considered to be careless, reckless or using excessive force:

• Kicks or attempts to kick an opponent

• Trips or attempts to trip an opponent

• Jumps at an opponent

• Charges an opponent

• Strikes or attempts to strike an opponent

• Pushes an opponent

A free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following offences:

• Tackles an opponent to gain possession of the ball, making contact with the opponent

before touching the ball

• Holds an opponent

• Spits at an opponent

• Handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within his/her own penalty area)

• Plays in a dangerous manner

• Impedes the progress of an opponent

• Prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his/her hands

• Commits any other offence, not previously mentioned in Law 12, for which play is stopped

to caution or dismiss a player

Penalty Kick

A penalty kick is awarded if any of the above offences is committed by a player inside his/her own

penalty area, irrespective of the position of the ball, provided it is in play.

A free kick is awarded to the opposing team if the goalkeeper:

• Takes more than 6 seconds to release the ball from his/her hands

• Touches the ball again with his/her hands after it has been released from his/her

possession and has not touched any other player

• Touches the ball with his/her hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him/her by a

team-mate

• Touches the ball with his/her hands after he/she has received it directly from a throw in

taken by a team-mate

For all these offences, the free kick should be taken from the penalty area line, parallel with the goal

line, at the nearest point to the offence.

Cautionable Offences

A player is cautioned and shown the yellow card if he/she commits any of the following seven

offences:

• Is guilty of unsporting behaviour

• Shows dissent by word or action

• Persistently infringes the Laws of the Game

• Delays the restart of play

• Fails to respect the required distance when play is restarted with a corner kick or free kick

• Enters or re-enters the field of play without the referee’s permission

• Deliberately leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission

FA MINI-SOCCER

Sending Off Offences

A player is sent off and shown the red card if he/she commits any of the following seven offences:

• Is guilty of serious foul play

• Is guilty of violent conduct

• Spits at an opponent or any other person

• Denies the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal scoring opportunity, by deliberately

handling the ball (this does not apply to a goalkeeper within his/her own penalty area)

• Denies an obvious goal scoring opportunity to an opponent moving towards the player’s

goal by an offence punishable by a free kick or penalty kick

• Uses offensive or insulting or abusive language and/or gestures

• Receives a second caution in the same match

LAW 13 - Free Kicks

For all free kicks opponents must be 4.5m (5 yards) from the ball.

LAW 14 - Penalty Kicks

A penalty kick is awarded for offences, as described in Law 12.

Position of the Ball and the Players

All players except the defending goalkeeper and kicker must be outside the penalty area and at least

4.5m (5 yards) from the penalty mark.

The ball must be kicked forward.

Infringement/Sanctions

If a player or players commit an offence at the taking of a penalty kick his/her team shall not be

allowed to gain an advantage (i.e. the kick is retaken or the goal is disallowed depending on which

team offended).

If a player of both the defending and the attacking teams offend, the kick shall be retaken.

LAW 15 - Throw-in

A goal cannot be scored directly from a throw-in.

A throw-in is awarded:

• When the whole of the ball passes over the touch line, either on the ground or in the air

• From the point where it crossed the touch line

• To the opponents of the player who last touched the ball

Procedure

At the moment of delivering the ball, the thrower:

• Faces the field of play

• Has part of each foot either on the touch line or on the ground outside the touch line

A thrower:

• Uses both hands

• Delivers the ball from behind and over the player’s head

• The throw-in is awarded to the opposing team if any of these requirements are not carried

out

The thrower may not touch the ball again until it has touched another player. If he/she does, a free

kick will be awarded against them. The ball is in play immediately when it enters the field of play.

FA MINI-SOCCER

FA MINI-SOCCER

LAW 16 - Goal Kick

Procedure

A player of the defending team kicks the ball from any point within the penalty area.

Opponents must remain outside the penalty area and at least 4.5m (5 yards) from where the kick is

taken until the ball is in play.

LAW 17 - Corner Kicks

The opposing players must remain at least 4.5m (5yards) from the ball until it is in play.

The kicker may not touch the ball again until it has touched another player. If he/she does, a free

kick is awarded against them.

The ball is in play immediately when it enters the field of play.

The Responsible Football Coach/Manager Code of Conduct for Football

1. Coaches/Managers must respect the rights, dignity and worth of each and every person

and treat each equally within the context of the sport.

2. Coaches/Managers must place the wellbeing and safety of each player above all other

considerations, including the development of performance.

3. Coaches/Managers must adhere to all guidelines laid down within the Constitution and the

Rules of The Football Association.

4. Coaches/Managers must develop an appropriate working relationship with each player

based on mutual trust and respect.

5. Coaches/Managers must not exert undue influence to obtain personal benefit or reward.

6. Coaches/Managers must encourage and guide players to accept responsibility for their

own behaviour and performance.

7. Coaches/Managers must ensure that the activities they direct or advocate is appropriate for

the age, maturity, experience and ability of players.

8. Coaches/Managers should, at the outset, clarify with the player (and where appropriate,

their parents) exactly what is expected of them and also what they are entitled to expect

from their coach.

9. Coaches/Managers must co-operate fully with other specialists (e.g. other coaches,

officials, sports scientists, doctors, physiotherapists) in the best interests of the player.

10. Coaches/Managers must always promote the appropriate Code of Conduct and positive

aspects of the sport (e.g. fair play) to players, parents and spectators alike. Never condone

violations of the Laws of the game, behaviour contrary to the spirit of the Laws of the game

or relevant rule and regulations or the use of the prohibited substances or techniques.

11. Coaches/Managers must consistently display high standards of behaviour and experience

and be a role model for players, parents and spectators.

Goalpost Safety

Remember to use all equipment, not just goalposts, safely at all times

It has been agreed by The FA that for season 2008/09, the use of any sized goals will be permissible

for the 9v9 game, whilst a transitional period continues to exist in this format of the game. However,

there is recognition that the 16’ x 7’ goals are most suitable during matches and as such clubs should

be encouraged to make the most of the Football Foundation’s funding to gain this size of goal. From

season 2009/10, only goals sized 16’ x 7’ will be permissible.

The Football Association, along with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Health and

Safety Executive and the British Standards Institution, would like to draw your attention to the

following guidelines for the safe use of goalposts. Too many serious injuries and fatalities have

occurred in recent years as a result of unsafe or incorrect use of goalposts. Safety is always of

paramount importance and everyone in football must play their part to prevent similar incidents

occurring in the future.

1. For safety reasons, goalposts of any size (including those which are portable and not

installed permanently at a pitch or practice field) must always be anchored securely to the

ground.

2. Portable goalposts must be secured as per the manufacturers’ instructions.

3. Under no circumstances should children or adults be allowed to climb on, swing or play

with the structure of the goalposts.

4. Particular attention should be drawn to the fact that if not properly assembled and secured,

portable goalposts may overturn.

5. Regular inspections of goalposts must be carried out to check that they are properly

maintained.

For reference, you should note that The FA and BSI developed a standard for future purchases of

mini-soccer goalposts - PAS 36:2000. Most other size of goalposts are covered by BSEN 748

(1996). Copies of both of these standards are available from BSI.

The FA together with representatives from the industry, sports governing bodies and Government

have prepared guidelines for pitch users and pitch providers together with technical parameters for

goalpost manufacturers. It is anticipated that details of these will feature on The FA’s website -

www.TheFA.com.

432 FA MINI-SOCCER In the twelve years since its last major revision of the Laws of the Game,

the International Football Association Board has made a signifi cant

number of additions and amendments to the Laws themselves, and

various accompanying publications and teaching materials have been

produced and distributed by football‘s governing bodies in order to

assist match offi cials in their duties and to clarify concepts for the

football community as a whole.

While this year’s edition of the Laws of the Game features only

one amendment to the 2007/2008 edition in terms of substance,

the overall wording and structure has been reviewed and revised to

consolidate and reorganise the content for the sake of consistency,

simplifi cation and clarifi cation. Among the most notable changes

in this respect, some of the Decisions of the International Football

Association Board from last year’s edition of the Laws of the Game

are now either incorporated in the Law to which they were previously

appended or appear in the section now entitled “Interpretation of

the Laws of the Game and Guidelines for Referees”. With this new

title, the International Football Association Board wishes to underline

that, while the content of this section is intended to complement the

Laws of the Game themselves, its application is indeed a compulsory

requirement.

In addition, certain principles that were previously implicitly understood

throughout the game but did not explicitly feature in the Laws of the

Game have been included in this new edition for completeness.

Finally, the International Football Association Board reminds the

associations and confederations that it is their duty, under the FIFA

Statutes, to ensure the Laws of the Game are implemented strictly

and consistently at all levels of competition.

PREFACE

4

NOTES ON THE LAWS OF THE GAME

Modifi cations

Subject to the agreement of the member association concerned and

provided the principles of these Laws are maintained, the Laws may

be modifi ed in their application for matches for players of under 16

years of age, for women footballers, for veteran footballers (over 35

years of age) and for players with disabilities.

Any or all of the following modifi cations are permissible:

• size of the fi eld of play

• size, weight and material of the ball

• width between the goalposts and height of the crossbar from the

ground

• duration of the periods of play

• substitutions

Further modifi cations are only allowed with the consent of the

International Football Association Board.

Male and Female

References to the male gender in the Laws of the Game in respect of

referees, assistant referees, players and offi cials are for simplifi cation

and apply to both males and females.

Key

A single line in the left-hand margin indicates new Law changes.

5

CONTENTS

Law Page

1 THE FIELD OF PLAY 6

2 THE BALL 13

3 THE NUMBER OF PLAYERS 15

4 THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT 18

5 THE REFEREE 21

6 THE ASSISTANT REFEREES 24

7 THE DURATION OF THE MATCH 25

8 THE START AND RESTART OF PLAY 27

9 THE BALL IN AND OUT OF PLAY 30

10 THE METHOD OF SCORING 31

11 OFFSIDE 32

12 FOULS AND MISCONDUCT 33

13 FREE KICKS 37

14 THE PENALTY KICK 41

15 THE THROW-IN 44

16 THE GOAL KICK 46

17 THE CORNER KICK 48

PROCEDURES TO DETERMINE THE WINNER OF A MATCH

OR HOME-AND-AWAY 50

THE TECHNICAL AREA 52

THE FOURTH OFFICIAL AND THE RESERVE ASSISTANT REFEREE 53

INTERPRETATION OF THE LAWS

OF THE GAME AND GUIDELINES FOR REFEREES 55

RULES OF THE INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION BOARD 129

6

LAW 1 – THE FIELD OF PLAY

Field Surface

Matches may be played on natural or artifi cial surfaces, according to

the rules of the competition.

The colour of artifi cial surfaces must be green.

Where artifi cial surfaces are used in either competition matches

between representative teams of member associations affi liated to

FIFA or international club competition matches, the surface must meet

the requirements of the FIFA Quality Concept for Artifi cial Turf or

the International Artifi cial Turf Standard, unless special dispensation

is given by FIFA.

Field Markings

The fi eld of play must be rectangular and marked with lines. These

lines belong to the areas of which they are boundaries.

The two longer boundary lines are called touch lines. The two shorter

lines are called goal lines.

The fi eld of play is divided into two halves by a halfway line, which

joins the midpoints of the two touch lines.

The centre mark is indicated at the midpoint of the halfway line.

A circle with a radius of 9.15 m (10 yds) is marked around it.

Marks may be made off the fi eld of play, 9.15 m (10 yds) from the

corner arc and at right angles to the goal lines and the touch lines, to

ensure that defending players retreat this distance when a corner kick

is being taken.

7

Dimensions

The length of the touch line must be greater than the length of the

goal line.

Length (touch line): minimum 90 m (100 yds)

maximum 120 m (130 yds)

Width (goal line): minimum 45 m (50 yds)

maximum 90 m (100 yds)

All lines must be of the same width, which must be not more than

12 cm (5 ins).

International Matches

Length: minimum 100 m (110 yds)

maximum 110 m (120 yds)

Width: minimum 64 m (70 yds)

maximum 75 m (80 yds)

The Goal Area

Two lines are drawn at right angles to the goal line, 5.5 m (6 yds) from

the inside of each goalpost. These lines extend into the fi eld of play

for a distance of 5.5 m (6 yds) and are joined by a line drawn parallel

with the goal line. The area bounded by these lines and the goal line

is the goal area.

8

LAW 1 – THE FIELD OF PLAY

The Penalty Area

Two lines are drawn at right angles to the goal line, 16.5 m (18 yds)

from the inside of each goalpost. These lines extend into the fi eld of

play for a distance of 16.5 m (18 yds) and are joined by a line drawn

parallel with the goal line. The area bounded by these lines and the

goal line is the penalty area.

Within each penalty area, a penalty mark is made 11 m (12 yds) from

the midpoint between the goalposts and equidistant to them.

An arc of a circle with a radius of 9.15 m (10 yds) from the centre of

each penalty mark is drawn outside the penalty area.

Flagposts

A fl agpost, not less than 1.5 m (5 ft) high, with a non-pointed top and

a fl ag must be placed at each corner.

Flagposts may also be placed at each end of the halfway line, not less

than 1 m (1 yd) outside the touch line.

The Corner Arc

A quarter circle with a radius of 1 m (1 yd) from each corner fl agpost

is drawn inside the fi eld of play.

9

Goals

A goal must be placed on the centre of each goal line.

A goal consists of two upright posts equidistant from the corner

fl agposts and joined at the top by a horizontal crossbar. The goalposts

and crossbar must be made of wood, metal or other approved

material. They may be square, rectangular, round or elliptical in shape

and must not be dangerous to players.

The distance between the posts is 7.32 m (8 yds) and the distance

from the lower edge of the crossbar to the ground is 2.44 m (8 ft).

Both goalposts and the crossbar have the same width and depth,

which do not exceed 12 cm (5 ins). The goal lines must be of the same

width as the goalposts and the crossbar. Nets may be attached to the

goals and the ground behind the goal, provided that they are properly

supported and do not interfere with the goalkeeper.

The goalposts and crossbars must be white.

Safety

Goals must be anchored securely to the ground. Portable goals may

only be used if they satisfy this requirement.

7.32 m (8 yds)

2.44 m

(8 ft)

10

LAW 1 – THE FIELD OF PLAY

The Field of Play

Corner Flagpost

PENALTY AREA

GOAL LINE CORNER ARC

OPTIONAL

MARK

TOUCH LINE

CENTRE MARK

CENTRE CIRCLE

HALFWAY LINE

PENALTY ARC

FLAGPOST

(optional)

TOUCH LINE

GOAL LINE

GOAL AREA

PENALTY MARK

CORNER FLAGPOST

(compulsory)

OPTIONAL MARK

Flag to be not less than

1.5 m/5 ft high with a

non-pointed top

Lines to be not more

than 12 cm/5 ins

wide

Corner flagpost is compulsory

Corner arc

11

Metric Measurements

Imperial Measurements

16.5m

1m radius

Length: Maximum 120m Minimum 90m

Width:

Maximum 90m Minimum 45m

7.32m

9.15m

11m

5.5m

16.5m

Radius:

9.15m

5.5m

9.15m

9.15m

18 yds

1 yd radius

Length: Maximum 130 yds Minimum 100 yds

Width:

Maximum 100 yds Minimum 50 yds

8 yds

10 yds

12 yds

6 yds

18 yds

Radius:

10 yds

6 yds

10 yds

10 yds

12

LAW 1 – THE FIELD OF PLAY

Decisions of the International F.A. Board

Decision 1

Where a technical area exists, it must meet the requirements approved

by the International F.A. Board, which are contained in the section of

this publication entitled The Technical Area.

13

Qualities and Measurements

The ball is:

• spherical

• made of leather or other suitable material

• of a circumference of not more than 70 cm (28 ins) and not less

than 68 cm (27 ins)

• not more than 450 g (16 oz) and not less than 410 g

(14 oz) in weight at the start of the match

• of a pressure equal to 0.6 – 1.1 atmosphere (600 – 1,100 g/cm2)

at sea level (8.5 lbs/sq in – 15.6 lbs/sq in)

Replacement of a Defective Ball

If the ball bursts or becomes defective during the course of a match:

• the match is stopped

• the match is restarted by dropping the replacement ball at the

place where the original ball became defective, unless play was

stopped inside the goal area, in which case the referee drops the

replacement ball on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at

the point nearest to where the original ball was located when play

was stopped

If the ball bursts or becomes defective whilst not in play at a kick-off,

goal kick, corner kick, free kick, penalty kick or throw-in:

• the match is restarted accordingly

The ball may not be changed during the match without the authority

of the referee.

LAW 2 – THE BALL

14

LAW 2 – THE BALL

Decisions of the International F.A. Board

Decision 1

In addition to the requirements of Law 2, acceptance of a ball for

use in matches played in an offi cial competition organised under the

auspices of FIFA or the confederations is conditional upon the ball

bearing one of the following:

• the offi cial “FIFA APPROVED” logo

• the offi cial “FIFA INSPECTED” logo

• the “INTERNATIONAL MATCHBALL STANDARD” logo

Such a logo on a ball indicates that it has been tested offi cially and

found to be in compliance with specifi c technical requirements,

different for each logo and additional to the minimum specifi cations

stipulated in Law 2. The list of the additional requirements specifi c to

each of the respective logos must be approved by the International

F.A. Board. The institutes conducting the tests are subject to the

approval of FIFA.

Member association competitions may also require the use of balls

bearing any one of these three logos.

Decision 2

In matches played in an offi cial competition organised under the

auspices of FIFA, the confederations or the member associations,

no form of commercial advertising on the ball is permitted, except

for the emblem of the competition, the competition organiser and

the authorised trademark of the manufacturer. The competition

regulations may restrict the size and number of such markings.

15

LAW 3 – THE NUMBER OF PLAYERS

Players

A match is played by two teams, each consisting of not more than

eleven players, one of whom is the goalkeeper. A match may not start

if either team consists of fewer than seven players.

Offi cial Competitions

Up to a maximum of three substitutes may be used in any match

played in an offi cial competition organised under the auspices of FIFA,

the confederations or the member associations.

The rules of the competition must state how many substitutes may be

nominated, from three up to a maximum of seven.

Other Matches

In national A team matches, up to a maximum of six substitutes may

be used.

In all other matches, a greater number of substitutes may be used

provided that:

• the teams concerned reach agreement on a maximum number

• the referee is informed before the match

If the referee is not informed, or if no agreement is reached before the

match, no more than six substitutes are allowed.

All Matches

In all matches, the names of the substitutes must be given to the

referee prior to the start of the match. Any substitute whose name is

not given to the referee at this time may not take part in the match.

16

LAW 3 – THE NUMBER OF PLAYERS

Substitution Procedure

To replace a player with a substitute, the following conditions must be

observed:

• the referee must be informed before any proposed substitution is

made

• the substitute only enters the fi eld of play after the player being

replaced has left and after receiving a signal from the referee

• the substitute only enters the fi eld of play at the halfway line and

during a stoppage in the match

• the substitution is completed when a substitute enters the fi eld of

play

• from that moment, the substitute becomes a player and the player

he has replaced becomes a substituted player

• the substituted player takes no further part in the match

• all substitutes are subject to the authority and jurisdiction of the

referee, whether called upon to play or not

17

Changing the Goalkeeper

Any of the other players may change places with the goalkeeper,

provided that:

• the referee is informed before the change is made

• the change is made during a stoppage in the match

Infringements and Sanctions

If a substitute or substitituted player enters the fi eld of play without

the referee’s permission:

• the referee stops play (although not immediately if the substitute

or substituted player does not interfere with play)

• the referee cautions him for unsporting behaviour and orders him

to leave the fi eld of play

• if the referee has stopped play, it is restarted with an indirect free

kick for the opposing team from the position of the ball at the time

of the stoppage (see Law 13 – Position of Free Kick)

If a player changes places with the goalkeeper without the referee’s

permission before the change is made:

• the referee allows play to continue

• the referee cautions the players concerned when the ball is next

out of play

In the event of any other infringements of this Law:

• the players concerned are cautioned

• the match is restarted with an indirect free kick, to be taken by a

player of the opposing team from the position of the ball at the

time of the stoppage (see Law 13 – Position of Free Kick)

Players and Substitutes Sent Off

A player who has been sent off before the kick-off may be replaced

only by one of the named substitutes.

A named substitute who has been sent off, either before the kick-off

or after play has started, may not be replaced.

18

LAW 4 – THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT

Safety

A player must not use equipment or wear anything that is dangerous

to himself or another player (including any kind of jewellery).

Basic Equipment

The basic compulsory equipment of a player comprises the following

separate items:

• a jersey or shirt with sleeves – if undergarments are worn, the

colour of the sleeve must be the same main colour as the sleeve

of the jersey or shirt.

• shorts – if undershorts are worn, they must be of the same main

colour as the shorts

• stockings

• shinguards

• footwear

Shinguards

• are covered entirely by the stockings

• are made of rubber, plastic or a similar suitable material

• provide a reasonable degree of protection

Colours

• The two teams must wear colours that distinguish them from each

other and also the referee and the assistant referees

• Each goalkeeper must wear colours that distinguish him from the

other players, the referee and the assistant referees

19

Infringements and Sanctions

In the event of any infringement of this Law:

• play need not be stopped

• the player at fault is instructed by the referee to leave the fi eld of

play to correct his equipment

• the player leaves the fi eld of play when the ball next ceases to be

in play, unless he has already corrected his equipment

• any player required to leave the fi eld of play to correct his equipment

must not re-enter without the referee’s permission

• the referee checks that the player’s equipment is correct before

allowing him to re-enter the fi eld of play

• the player is only allowed to re-enter the fi eld of play when the

ball is out of play

A player who has been required to leave the fi eld of play because of an

infringement of this Law and who re-enters the fi eld of play without

the referee’s permission must be cautioned.

Restart of Play

If play is stopped by the referee to administer a caution:

• the match is restarted by an indirect free kick taken by a player

of the opposing team, from the place where the ball was located

when the referee stopped the match (see Law 13 – Position of Free

Kick)

20

LAW 4 – THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT

Decisions of the International F.A. Board

Decision 1

Players must not reveal undergarments showing slogans or advertising.

The basic compulsory equipment must not have any political, religious

or personal statements.

A player removing his jersey or shirt to reveal slogans or advertising

will be sanctioned by the competition organiser. The team of a player

whose basic compulsory equipment has political, religious or personal

slogans or statements will be sanctioned by the competition organiser

or by FIFA.

21

The Authority of the Referee

Each match is controlled by a referee who has full authority to enforce

the Laws of the Game in connection with the match to which he has

been appointed.

Powers and Duties

The Referee:

• enforces the Laws of the Game

• controls the match in cooperation with the assistant referees and,

where applicable, with the fourth offi cial

• ensures that any ball used meets the requirements of Law 2

• ensures that the players’ equipment meets the requirements of

Law 4

• acts as timekeeper and keeps a record of the match

• stops, suspends or abandons the match, at his discretion, for any

infringements of the Laws

• stops, suspends or abandons the match because of outside

interference of any kind

• stops the match if, in his opinion, a player is seriously injured and

ensures that he is removed from the fi eld of play. An injured player

may only return to the fi eld of play after the match has restarted

• allows play to continue until the ball is out of play if a player is, in

his opinion, only slightly injured

• ensures that any player bleeding from a wound leaves the fi eld

of play. The player may only return on receiving a signal from the

referee, who must be satisfi ed that the bleeding has stopped

• allows play to continue when the team against which an offence

has been committed will benefi t from such an advantage and

penalises the original offence if the anticipated advantage does

not ensue at that time

• punishes the more serious offence when a player commits more

than one offence at the same time

• takes disciplinary action against players guilty of cautionable

and sending-off offences. He is not obliged to take this action

immediately but must do so when the ball next goes out of play

LAW 5 – THE REFEREE

22

LAW 5 – THE REFEREE

• takes action against team offi cials who fail to conduct themselves

in a responsible manner and may, at his discretion, expel them

from the fi eld of play and its immediate surrounds

• acts on the advice of the assistant referees regarding incidents that

he has not seen

• ensures that no unauthorised persons enter the fi eld of play

• indicates the restart of the match after it has been stopped

• provides the appropriate authorities with a match report, which

includes information on any disciplinary action taken against players

and/or team offi cials and any other incidents that occurred before,

during or after the match

Decisions of the Referee

The decisions of the referee regarding facts connected with play,

including whether or not a goal is scored and the result of the match,

are fi nal.

The referee may only change a decision on realising that it is incorrect

or, at his discretion, on the advice of an assistant referee or the fourth

offi cial, provided that he has not restarted play or terminated the

match.

23

Decisions of the International F.A. Board

Decision 1

A referee (or where applicable, an assistant referee or fourth offi cial)

is not held liable for:

any kind of injury suffered by a player, offi cial or spectator

any damage to property of any kind

any other loss suffered by any individual, club, company, association

or other body, which is due or which may be due to any decision that

he may take under the terms of the Laws of the Game or in respect of

the normal procedures required to hold, play and control a match.

Such decisions may include:

• a decision that the condition of the fi eld of play or its surrounds or

that the weather conditions are such as to allow or not to allow a

match to take place

• a decision to abandon a match for whatever reason

• a decision as to the suitability of the fi eld equipment and ball used

during a match

• a decision to stop or not to stop a match due to spectator interference

or any problem in spectator areas

• a decision to stop or not to stop play to allow an injured player to

be removed from the fi eld of play for treatment

• a decision to require an injured player to be removed from the fi eld

of play for treatment

• a decision to allow or not to allow a player to wear certain apparel

or equipment

• a decision (where he has the authority) to allow or not to allow

any persons (including team or stadium offi cials, security offi cers,

photographers or other media representatives) to be present in the

vicinity of the fi eld of play

• any other decision that he may take in accordance with the Laws

of the Game or in conformity with his duties under the terms

of FIFA, confederation, member association or league rules or

regulations under which the match is played

Decision 2

In tournaments or competitions where a fourth offi cial is appointed, his

role and duties must be in accordance with the guidelines approved by

the International F.A. Board, which are contained in this publication.

24

LAW 6 – THE ASSISTANT REFEREES

Duties

Two assistant referees may be appointed whose duties, subject to the

decision of the referee, are to indicate:

• when the whole of the ball leaves the fi eld of play

• which team is entitled to a corner kick, goal kick or throw-in

• when a player may be penalised for being in an offside position

• when a substitution is requested

• when misconduct or any other incident occurs out of the view of

the referee

• when offences have been committed whenever the assistant

referees have a better view than the referee (this includes, in

certain circumstances, offences committed in the penalty area)

• whether, at penalty kicks, the goalkeeper moves off the goal line

before the ball is kicked and if the ball crosses the line

Assistance

The assistant referees also assist the referee to control the match in

accordance with the Laws of the Game. In particular, they may enter

the fi eld of play to help control the 9.15 m (10 yds) distance.

In the event of undue interference or improper conduct, the referee

will relieve an assistant referee of his duties and make a report to the

appropriate authorities.

25

Periods of Play

The match lasts two equal periods of 45 minutes, unless otherwise

mutually agreed between the referee and the two teams. Any agreement

to alter the duration of the periods of play (for example, to reduce each

half to 40 minutes because of insuffi cient light) must be made before

the start of play and must comply with competition rules.

Half-time Interval

Players are entitled to an interval at half-time.

The half-time interval must not exceed 15 minutes.

Competition rules must state the duration of the half-time interval.

The duration of the half-time interval may be altered only with the

consent of the referee.

LAW 7 – THE DURATION OF THE MATCH

26

LAW 7 – THE DURATION OF THE MATCH

Allowance for Time Lost

Allowance is made in either period for all time lost through:

• substitutions

• assessment of injury to players

• removal of injured players from the fi eld of play for treatment

• wasting time

• any other cause

The allowance for time lost is at the discretion of the referee.

Penalty Kick

If a penalty kick has to be taken or retaken, the duration of either half

is extended until the penalty kick is completed.

Abandoned Match

An abandoned match is replayed unless the competition rules provide

otherwise.

27

Preliminaries

A coin is tossed and the team that wins the toss decides which goal

it will attack in the fi rst half of the match.

The other team takes the kick-off to start the match.

The team that wins the toss takes the kick-off to start the second half

of the match.

In the second half of the match, the teams change ends and attack

the opposite goals.

Kick-off

A kick-off is a way of starting or restarting play:

• at the start of the match

• after a goal has been scored

• at the start of the second half of the match

• at the start of each period of extra time, where applicable

A goal may be scored directly from the kick-off.

Procedure

• all players must be in their own half of the fi eld of play

• the opponents of the team taking the kick-off are at least 9.15 m

(10 yds) from the ball until it is in play

• the ball must be stationary on the centre mark

• the referee gives a signal

• the ball is in play when it is kicked and moves forward

• the kicker must not touch the ball again until it has touched another

player

After a team scores a goal, the kick-off is taken by the other team.

LAW 8 – THE START AND RESTART OF PLAY

28

LAW 8 – THE START AND RESTART OF PLAY

Infringements and Sanctions

If the player taking the kick-off touches the ball again before it has

touched another player:

• an indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team to be taken

from the position of the ball when the infringement occurred (see

Law 13 – Position of Free Kick)

In the event of any other infringement of the kick-off procedure:

• the kick-off is retaken

Dropped Ball

If, while the ball is still in play, the referee is required to stop play

temporarily for any reason not mentioned elsewhere in the Laws of

the Game, the match is restarted with a dropped ball.

29

Procedure

The referee drops the ball at the place where it was located when play

was stopped, unless play was stopped inside the goal area, in which

case the referee drops the ball on the goal area line parallel to the goal

line at the point nearest to where the ball was located when play was

stopped.

Play restarts when the ball touches the ground.

Infringements and Sanctions

The ball is dropped again:

• if it is touched by a player before it makes contact with the

ground

• if the ball leaves the fi eld of play after it makes contact with the

ground, without a player touching it

30

Ball Out of Play

The ball is out of play when:

• it has wholly crossed the goal line or touch line whether on the

ground or in the air

• play has been stopped by the referee

Ball In Play

The ball is in play at all other times, including when:

• it rebounds off a goalpost, crossbar or corner fl agpost and remains

in the fi eld of play

• it rebounds off either the referee or an assistant referee when they

are on the fi eld of play

LAW 9 – THE BALL IN AND OUT OF PLAY

Ball in play

Ball out of play

Ball in play

Ball rebounding from

corner fl agpost,

goalpost or crossbar into

fi eld of play is in play

Ball in play

Ball in play

31

Goal Scored

A goal is scored when the whole of the ball passes over the goal

line, between the goalposts and under the crossbar, provided that no

infringement of the Laws of the Game has been committed previously

by the team scoring the goal.

Winning Team

The team scoring the greater number of goals during a match is the

winner. If both teams score an equal number of goals, or if no goals

are scored, the match is drawn.

Competition Rules

When competition rules require there to be a winning team after

a match or home-and-away tie, the only permitted procedures for

determining the winning team are those approved by the International

F.A. Board, namely:

• away goals rule

• extra time

• kicks from the penalty mark

LAW 10 – THE METHOD OF SCORING

No goal

No goal

No goal

Goal

32

LAW 11 – OFFSIDE

Offside Position

It is not an offence in itself to be in an offside position.

A player is in an offside position if:

• he is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the

second last opponent

A player is not in an offside position if:

• he is in his own half of the fi eld of play or

• he is level with the second last opponent or

• he is level with the last two opponents

Offence

A player in an offside position is only penalised if, at the moment the

ball touches or is played by one of his team, he is, in the opinion of

the referee, involved in active play by:

• interfering with play or

• interfering with an opponent or

• gaining an advantage by being in that position

No Offence

There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from:

• a goal kick

• a throw-in

• a corner kick

Infringements and Sanctions

In the event of an offside offence, the referee awards an indirect

free kick to the opposing team to be taken from the place where the

infringement occurred (see Law 13 – Position of Free Kick).

33

Fouls and misconduct are penalised as follows:

Direct Free Kick

A direct free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits

any of the following seven offences in a manner considered by the

referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force:

• kicks or attempts to kick an opponent

• trips or attempts to trip an opponent

• jumps at an opponent

• charges an opponent

• strikes or attempts to strike an opponent

• pushes an opponent

• tackles an opponent

A direct free kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player

commits any of the following three offences:

• holds an opponent

• spits at an opponent

• handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within his

own penalty area)

A direct free kick is taken from the place where the offence occurred

(see Law 13 – Position of Free Kick).

Penalty Kick

A penalty kick is awarded if any of the above ten offences is committed

by a player inside his own penalty area, irrespective of the position of

the ball, provided it is in play.

LAW 12 – FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

34

LAW 12 – FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

Indirect Free Kick

An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper,

inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following four offences:

• controls the ball with his hands for more than six seconds before

releasing it from his possession

• touches the ball again with his hands after he has released it from

his possession and before it has touched another player

• touches the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately kicked

to him by a team-mate

• touches the ball with his hands after he has received it directly from

a throw-in taken by a team-mate

An indirect free kick is also awarded to the opposing team if, in the

opinion of the referee, a player:

• plays in a dangerous manner

• impedes the progress of an opponent

• prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his hands

• commits any other offence, not previously mentioned in Law 12,

for which play is stopped to caution or send off a player

The indirect free kick is taken from the place where the offence

occurred (see Law 13 – Position of Free Kick).

35

Disciplinary Sanctions

The yellow card is used to communicate that a player, substitute or

substituted player has been cautioned.

The red card is used to communicate that a player, substitute or

substituted player has been sent off.

Only a player, substitute or substituted player may be shown the red

or yellow card.

The referee has the authority to take disciplinary sanctions from the

moment he enters the fi eld of play until he leaves the fi eld of play after

the fi nal whistle.

A player who commits a cautionable or sending-off offence, either

on or off the fi eld of play, whether directed towards an opponent, a

team-mate, the referee, an assistant referee or any other person, is

disciplined according to the nature of the offence committed.

Cautionable Offences

A player is cautioned and shown the yellow card if he commits any of

the following seven offences:

• unsporting behaviour

• dissent by word or action

• persistent infringement of the Laws of the Game

• delaying the restart of play

• failure to respect the required distance when play is restarted with

a corner kick, free kick or throw-in

• entering or re-entering the fi eld of play without the referee’s

permission

• deliberately leaving the field of play without the referee’s

permission

A substitute or substituted player is cautioned if he commits any of

the following three offences:

• unsporting behaviour

• dissent by word or action

• delaying the restart of play

36

LAW 12 – FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

Sending-off Offences

A player, substitute or substituted player is sent off if he commits any

of the following seven offences:

• serious foul play

• violent conduct

• spitting at an opponent or any other person

• denying the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring

opportunity by deliberately handling the ball (this does not apply

to a goalkeeper within his own penalty area)

• denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity to an opponent

moving towards the player’s goal by an offence punishable by a

free kick or a penalty kick

• using offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or gestures

• receiving a second caution in the same match

A player, substitute or substituted player who has been sent off must

leave the vicinity of the fi eld of play and the technical area.

37

LAW 13 – FREE KICKS

Types of Free Kick

Free kicks are either direct or indirect.

The Direct Free Kick

Ball Enters the Goal

• if a direct free kick is kicked directly into the opponents’ goal, a

goal is awarded

• if a direct free kick is kicked directly into the team’s own goal, a

corner kick is awarded to the opposing team

The Indirect Free Kick

Signal

The referee indicates an indirect free kick by raising his arm above his

head. He maintains his arm in that position until the kick has been

taken and the ball has touched another player or goes out of play.

Ball Enters the Goal

A goal can be scored only if the ball subsequently touches another

player before it enters the goal:

• if an indirect free kick is kicked directly into the opponents’ goal,

a goal kick is awarded

• if an indirect free kick is kicked directly into the team’s own goal,

a corner kick is awarded to the opposing team

Procedure

For both direct and indirect free kicks, the ball must be stationary

when the kick is taken and the kicker must not touch the ball again

until it has touched another player.

38

LAW 13 – FREE KICKS

Position of Free Kick

Free Kick Inside the Penalty Area

Direct or indirect free kick to the defending team:

• all opponents must be at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the ball

• all opponents must remain outside the penalty area until the ball

is in play

• the ball is in play when it is kicked directly out of the penalty

area

• a free kick awarded in the goal area may be taken from any point

inside that area

Indirect free kick to the attacking team:

• all opponents must be at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the ball until

it is in play, unless they are on their own goal line between the

goalposts

• the ball is in play when it is kicked and moves

• an indirect free kick awarded inside the goal area must be taken

on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest

to where the infringement occurred

Free Kick Outside the Penalty Area

• all opponents must be at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the ball until

it is in play

• the ball is in play when it is kicked and moves

• the free kick is taken from the place where the infringement

occurred or from the position of the ball when the infringement

occurred (according to the infringement)

39

Infringements and Sanctions

If, when a free kick is taken, an opponent is closer to the ball than

the required distance:

• the kick is retaken

If, when a free kick is taken by the defending team from inside its own

penalty area, the ball is not kicked directly out of the penalty area:

• the kick is retaken

Free kick taken by a player other than the goalkeeper

If, after the ball is in play, the kicker touches the ball again (except

with his hands) before it has touched another player:

• an indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team, the kick

to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred (see

Law 13 – Position of Free Kick)

If, after the ball is in play, the kicker deliberately handles the ball

before it has touched another player:

• a direct free kick is awarded to the opposing team, the kick to be

taken from the place where the infringement occurred (see Law

13 – Position of Free Kick)

• a penalty kick is awarded if the infringement occurred inside the

kicker’s penalty area

40

LAW 13 – FREE KICKS

Free kick taken by the goalkeeper

If, after the ball is in play, the goalkeeper touches the ball again

(except with his hands), before it has touched another player:

• an indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team, the kick

to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred (see

Law 13 – Position of Free Kick)

If, after the ball is in play, the goalkeeper deliberately handles the ball

before it has touched another player:

• a direct free kick is awarded to the opposing team if the infringement

occurred outside the goalkeeper’s penalty area, the kick to be taken

from the place where the infringement occurred (see Law 13 –

Position of Free Kick)

• an indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if the

infringement occurred inside the goalkeeper’s penalty area, the

kick to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred

(see Law 13 – Position of Free Kick)

41

A penalty kick is awarded against a team that commits one of the ten

offences for which a direct free kick is awarded, inside its own penalty

area and while the ball is in play.

A goal may be scored directly from a penalty kick.

Additional time is allowed for a penalty kick to be taken at the end of

each half or at the end of periods of extra time.

Position of the Ball and the Players

The ball:

• must be placed on the penalty mark

The player taking the penalty kick:

• must be properly identifi ed

The defending goalkeeper:

• must remain on his goal line, facing the kicker, between the

goalposts until the ball has been kicked

The players other than the kicker must be located:

• inside the fi eld of play

• outside the penalty area

• behind the penalty mark

• at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the penalty mark

LAW 14 – THE PENALTY KICK

42

LAW 14 – THE PENALTY KICK

Procedure

• After the players have taken positions in accordance with this Law,

the referee signals for the penalty kick to be taken

• The player taking the penalty kick must kick the ball forward

• He must not play the ball again until it has touched another player

• The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves forward

When a penalty kick is taken during the normal course of play, or time

has been extended at half-time or full time to allow a penalty kick to

be taken or retaken, a goal is awarded if, before passing between the

goalposts and under the crossbar:

• the ball touches either or both of the goalposts and/or the crossbar

and/or the goalkeeper

The referee decides when a penalty kick has been completed.

Infringements and Sanctions

If the referee gives the signal for a penalty kick to be taken and,

before the ball is in play, one of the following occurs:

the player taking the penalty kick infringes the Laws of the Game:

• the referee allows the kick to be taken

• if the ball enters the goal, the kick is retaken

• if the ball does not enter the g

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