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Waverley Academy

To become a Waverley player it is important to learn the Waverley game. This guide will teach you all you need to know about bowling. A good bowler's over will be a succession of dots that make the score book look nice and neat. However, a Waverley over will look more like a game of noughts and crosses in the score book.


The basics;

  1. Stride up to the stumps looking confident and professional; remove your hat and jumper in preparation to give to the umpire before you arrive.
  2. If the umpire refuses to take your hat and jumper this is generally a good sign that you are standing at the wrong end. REMEMBER: - We changed ends at the end of the last over.
  3. Once you find yourself at the correct end and the umpire has taken your hat and jumper you should prepare your run-up.
  4. Take positive strides away from the strip as if you know how many to take. There is little point in trying to remember how many strides your run-up actually is as there will be so many marks around the strip you will soon get confused.
  5. Glare at the batsman and spin the ball in your hand menacingly. It is advised not to drop the ball as you would then look more of a prat than Hoagy would in a bandana.
  6. Charge in for the first ball and place mental bets on what the first ball will do. NOTE: - Screaming like a banshee is optional.
  7. Deliver the ball with a straight arm coming past the ear (Something I could never master). Ensure you stay behind the white crease line or you risk bowling a no ball.
  8. Retrieve the ball from the pond some forty yards behind the long-on boundary where the batsman has just dispatched you and repeat the process five more times.

Advanced section;
  1. Shining the ball - The ball is shined by "polishing' it on the inside of one's trouser leg. Dusters, rags, and wax polish are not allowed except in ladies cricket where regular dusting of all items is encouraged. Umpires should be extra vigilant of fielders entering the field in bright yellow trousers clearly made of lots of dusters sewn together with the expressed aim of polishing the ball as much as possible.
  2. No ball - result of over polishing the ball. Also a common occurrence in Jim Jams bowling.
  3. Overthrows - Overs thrown away by bad bowling.
  4. Hat-trick - An urban legend that suggests bowlers may occasionally take three wickets in successive deliveries. However, I could find no proof to support this claim.

Where next?

The Art of Fielding To become a Waverley player it is important to learn the Waverley game. This guide will teach you ho
The Art of Umpiring To become a Waverley player it is important to learn the Waverley game. This guide will teach you th

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